Julie D'Arcangelo - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage



Posted by Julie D'Arcangelo on 3/12/2019

If you know youíd like to buy a home in the future, youíve probably thought about saving money for all of the upfront costs that buying a home can bring. Saving the sizable amount of money that it takes for a down payment can be seemingly impossible to do. Itís impossible without making yourself seem miserable for a time, at least. You can save money creatively without sacrificing everything. Below, youíll find some tips for saving money that work for your life. 


Put Your Money Somewhere Safe


While investing in the stock market may seem like a good idea to put your savings on hyperdrive, itís risky. When it comes to your savings, try high interest savings accounts and CDs. The latter is a particularly good option because you wonít be able to touch the money for the time period that the CD will mature. Youíll also earn a bit of interest on the funds that are in there. 


If you plan to keep adding to your savings (which you should) a traditional savings account is best. You should have a dedicated account thatís solely for the house fund. Do some shopping around for the savings account that will have the best interest rate and be the easiest option for you. Remember that as boring as a savings account seems, itís a safe bet for your money. 


Apps Can Assist You


There are plenty of budgeting apps and apps that help you to set aside spare change. You should make use of these tools to help you reach your savings goals. Whether you need some help with budgeting or need to find ways to put your spare change to good use, thereís an app for that. You can even find apps that will reward you for good behavior. These apps may ďtipĒ you a few bucks for going to the gym or completing a project on time. Youíre saving money and doing good for yourself at the same time! Saving money for your future home can be fun if you find the right tools to help you.



Set Goals


One reason that many people donít save a lot of money is that they lack specific goals. If you sit down and look at your budget, youíll see where you can cut expenses. Then, youíll be able to have clear cut goals of how much you can save on a weekly or monthly basis. With your eyes on the prize of homeownership, you should be motivated to save where you can. Having specific numbers in mind can be a big help in reaching your long-term goals.




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Posted by Julie D'Arcangelo on 10/13/2015

The cost of heating can really take a toll on us over the colder fall and winter months. Having a programmable thermostat can help in cutting heating costs and still staying warm. But just having one isn't enough - you need to know how to use it to its full potential! Programmable thermostats have the ability to be programmed so that you can have multiple temperature settings through out the day. The benefit of this, is not having to think about turning down the heat before you leave for work, or cranking it up when you get home. Instead, you get heating at the exact temperature you want, when you want. So what temperatures should you set it to exactly? While you are home and awake, setting it to 68 degrees is a pretty standard temperature. While you are away from home, or sleeping, reducing it to 58 degrees should be tolerable. Of course, reducing the temperature even more than that while you are out of the house is possible, just don't make it too low and freeze your water pipes. Reducing your thermometer by 10-15 degrees for 8 hours (like while you are at work) you can save 5-15% off your heating bill. So the benefits can really pay off for reducing your heat while you are at work. For example: if you pay $200 a month in heating, reducing the heat by 15 degrees during the day will save $10-$30 a month which can add up to $60-$180 for the year if you use the heat for 6 months. Finding ways to cut costs is important to everyone during tough economic times. Every penny counts. So add this money saving tip to your list and you could start racking up the savings.







Julie D'Arcangelo
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